Events

Upcoming Events

How Geneticists Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Mutation
A lecture by Nathaniel Comfort, Johns Hopkins-History of Medicine

October 12, 2010

For more information: http://www.umich.edu/~umsts/events.htm


STPP Application Deadline

October 15, 2010

Find information on admission process: http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/research/stpp/admit.php


Application for Winter/Spring Session Deadline

October 15, 2010

The National Academies Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program:
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/policyfellows/index.htm


The Climate Fix: A Pragmatic Future for Climate Change
A lecture by Roger Pielke, Jr., University of Colorado, Boulder

October 25, 2010
4:00–5:30 p.m.
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
1110 Weill Hall
735 S. State Street

The world’s response to climate change is deeply flawed. The conventional wisdom on how to deal with climate change has failed and it’s time to change course. To date, climate policies have been guided by targets and timetables for emissions reduction derived from various academic exercises. Such methods are both oblivious to and in violation of on-the-ground political and technological realities that serve as practical “boundary conditions” for effective policy making. Until climate policies are designed with respect for these boundary conditions, failure is certain. Using nothing more than arithmetic and logical explanation, Dr. Pielke offers a comprehensive exploration of the problem and suggests a more practical resolution, including investment to create a more carbon-efficient economy and cost-efficient carbon-capture technologies.

Roger Pielke, Jr. is a Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where his research focuses on the intersection of science and technology with decision-making. He is a Fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, where he served as the Director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research from 2001–2007, and a senior fellow of the Breakthrough Institute. Before joining the faculty at the University of Colorado, he was a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Pielke is also the author or editor of several books, including The Climate Fix: What Scientists and Politicians Won’t Tell You About Global Warming (2010) and The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics (2007).


Breaking the Expertise Barrier: The New Politics of the Patent System in the United States and Europe
A lecture by Shobita Parthasarthy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

November 2, 2010
4:00–5:30 p.m.
1014 Tisch Hall
435 S. State Street

For more information: http://www.umich.edu/~umsts/events.htm


Humanitarian Work in a Changing Climate: How Can the Ford School and the Red Cross Help Each Other?
A lecture by Pablo Suarez, Associate Director of Programs for the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Center

November 8, 2010
4:00–5: 30 p.m.
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
1110 Weill Hall
735 S. State Street

Pablo Suarez is the Associate Director of Programs for the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Center in Boston. As a researcher and consultant focusing on climate and disaster, he studies the use of predictions in reducing vulnerability, with a special interest in applying knowledge for use by communities at risk. Dr. Suarez has worked with a wide variety of organizations, including the Environment Finance Group in the United Nations Development Program, Oxfam America, the World Food Programme, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the ProVention Consortium, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Cllimate Change, and many others. His work with Red Cross/Red Crescent preparing local communities for the adverse effects of climate change has taken him to over fifteen countries in all parts of Africa, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and Latin America.


Threading a Very Fine Needle: Race, Gender, and the Public Policy of Reproductive Genetic Technologies

November 22, 2010
4:00–5:30 p.m.
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
1110 Weill Hall
735 S. State Street

Sujatha Jesudason is the founder and Executive Director of Generations Ahead, an organization that seeks to advance a social justice perspective in the public policy debates on genetic technologies. She began working at the intersection of race, reproduction, and genetics at the Center for Genetics and Society in 2004, and has been active as an organizer, advocate, and researcher in communities of color and on women’s liberation issues for over 19 years. Her recent projects include developing a national collaborative campaign against sex selection, making the connections between past, present, and future eugenic technologies, and framing genetic justice as a human right. She serves on the Board of Directors of the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum, and earned her PhD in sociology at the University of California at Berkeley.


How the Secret Nuclear Trade Arms America’s Enemies

December 7, 2010
4:00–5:30 p.m.
Palmer Commons
Forum Hall, 4th Floor
100 Washtenaw Ave.

Free and open to the public.

David Albright, President of Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS)

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Physics and Political Science; Science, Technology and Public Policy; Center for Research on Learning and Teaching


AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowships Application Deadline

December 5, 2010

For more information: http://fellowships.aaas.org/04_Become/04_Application.shtml#GI